Residence Life

Concordia College offers students several options for on-campus living, with six residence halls featuring living arrangements to suit each student’s needs. They are safe and secure, with Resident Assistants always on hand for answers to questions, to provide support, and keep you up-to-date on information on student activities and other important campus issues.

Those students looking for a single-sex living environment will find what they are looking for Sieker (men) or Bohm (women) Halls (picture on the right).

Sieker and Bohm Halls also offer spacious double and triple occupancy rooms, while Romoser and Rippe Halls are double occupancy (picture below). Rippe and Romoser Halls feature combined living with specific sections being designated for men or women. Rippe Hall is the home of the First Year Learning Community for men and women.


Check out our residence halls floor plans here.

Our traditional residence halls have recently undergone extensive renovations to our common areas and residence hall rooms. Each building is equipped with bathrooms and showers on each floor or section, a comfortable TV lounge/study area, vending machines, and a laundry room.

Located along White Plains Road just a one minute walk from classrooms and the main campus, Ressmeyer Hall is a beautiful three-story house that accommodates students who are members of our Campus Christian Ministry organization. This residence features room accommodations, bathrooms on each floor, and a lounge with TV on the first floor.

Also located on White Plains Road, Koepchen Hall is home to Post-Baccalaureate Nursing, graduate and non-traditional students. With room accommodations and features very similar to those of Ressmeyer Hall, Koepchen is a beautiful house and a learning community.

First-Year Learning Community

The First-Year Learning Community at Concordia College provides an opportunity for incoming first-year students to join a residential community that supports their academic success and transition to college life. Through research and our own experience, we know that students who participate in learning communities are more likely to have higher grades, to find opportunities to interact with faculty, to get involved in campus activities and events, and to report greater satisfaction with their overall college experience. This is because the learning community allows students to live and learn in an environment designed specifically for success on campus and beyond. Students in the learning community live together in the same residence hall (men and women are separated by floors and sections) and take the First-Year Seminar class together.  Members of the First-Year Learning community host and plan various service learning projects as well as social events. They also are given opportunities to meet faculty and to learn outside of the classroom by attending various academic events. Through these various activities, students gain leadership skills that will help throughout college and beyond.